Winston-Salem and Triad North Carolina

Discussion in 'Travel Stories' started by giradman, Jun 14, 2016.

  1. giradman

    giradman
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    Thanks Scifan.. - just posted Part II of our visit today - bought some 'goodies' at the Winkler Bakery, which still uses a 'domed oven' heated by wood (and as described in the short quote below).

    Also, thanks for the info & link on Saskatchewan - Susan & I have been to Canada many times, but not to the middle Provinces - our visits have included British Columbia & Alberta on the west, and many more visits to the Eastern Provinces, i.e. Ontario, Quebec, Nova Scotia, and PEI - our last visit was to Quebec but has been nearly 10 years ago - Dave :)


     
  2. giradman

    giradman
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    MESDA - Museum of Early Southern Decorative Arts

    The Museum of Early Southern Decorative Arts is one of the Old Salem museums opened in 1965 by Frank L. Horton and his mother - a couple of quotes below from the link - check the website for MUCH more information. Today, we just did the self-tour, but a guided tour is available that explores the nearly dozen rooms representing a variety of 'arts' (e.g. furniture, paintings, pottery, silverware, etc.) from the following states - Maryland, Virginia, Carolinas, Georgia, Tennessee, & Kentucky. I've done the guided tour twice in the past but not since the move to the present building - its length is at least 90 minutes, so not sure that Susan would survive w/o a nap - ;) - SO, I'll probably schedule one just for myself - as an amateur woodworking, this is truly a unique experience. The pics below are all from the web showing a number of the rooms that are available to view on the guided tour. Dave :)

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  3. giradman

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    Moravians & Music - Moravian Music Foundation

    The Moravians have a rich musical history, both sacred & secular - instrumentation varies widely from use of the organ, string chamber music, sacred concerted vocal works, to woodwind/brass bands - quoted below just a few excerpts from the FAQ of the Moravian Music Foundation (links in quotes), which was chartered as a nonprofit corporation in Winston-Salem, North Carolina in May 1956, so 60th anniversary this year. The organization archives the musical accomplishments of the Moravians throughout the centuries, presents educational activities, and publishes music. Below is a link to a YouTube video of a 60+ minute talk on the history of Moravian music - the first 30 minutes will provide a sufficient introduction but will be hard to stop listening.

    The Moravians were also important in instrument building w/ one of the first (and most famous) organ builders in America, David Tannenberg (1728-1804) - he constructed a number of organs in Salem, the largest now in the Old Salem Visitor's Center (see pic below and a CD of the organ being played by Peter Sykes - I've also heard this instrument 'in person'). The other CDs that I own (both 2-disc sets) are secular chamber works by John Antes (1740-1811) (American born) and Johann Peter (1746-1813), who came to Salem in 1780, stayed 10 years, and had much impact on its musical activity. Brass Bands were and still are important in Moravian music - a famous NC regimental band from the Civil War is also pictured below - the Moravian Music Foundation has published several recorded volumes of the music they played (one disc below which I do not own but may obtain).

    An excellent book on America's Music by Gilbert Chase is in my book collection and devotes about 4-5 pages to the Moravians and their musical accomplishments w/ discussions of the two composers mentioned above. The roster of Moravian composers then and now is impressive - from the book "thus for more than a century and a half there was an unbroken tradition, w/ a cohesion & continuity unmatched in the annals of American musical composition.”

    Finally, Moravian music continues to the present in many forms - e.g. Moravians from around the world meet in 'brass band' conventions (several are planned for Winston-Salem in 2017 & 2018). Lovefeasts and Easter Sunrise events are common - the last pic below of the Easter Sunrise Service held at God's Acre in Old Salem just a few months ago. Dave :)

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  4. giradman

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    Winston - Origins & Another Story!

    In 1849, the North Carolina legislature divided Stokes County and created Forsyth County (see first map below) - the new county was named after Benjamin Forsyth (ca. 1760s - 1814), born in Virginia or possibly in Stokes County - he was an officer in the War of 1812 and campaigned in the Northern Theater; he was killed in 1814 (see the additional pics below).

    The logical site for the 'new' county seat and courthouse was Salem, but the Moravians were strongly opposed, wanting to maintain their 'isolationism.' Instead, they sold 51 acres of land to the county for the site of the new town (and county seat) - the land was nearby, and in 1851 named Winston in honor of the North Carolina Revolutionary War hero, Joseph Winston (see first quote below). The closeness of the two towns can be seen in the modern aerial view which I've annotated - Business 40 is the dividing line but the distance is easily walked. The last map is modern Forsyth County - Winston-Salem is the largest city followed by the smaller towns of Clemmons & Kernersville (circled in blue) - presently, the county has over 350,000 people. The next posts will discuss the growth of Winston, especially following the appearance of RJ Reynolds - Dave :)

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  5. suenc

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    Salem Tavern has greatly improved its menu from "
    Ginger cookies! I bought and ate too many. The official Moravian cookies are paper-thin. Ginger is traditional but there are other yummy flavors.
     
  6. suenc

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    MESDA is Dave’s dream museum because it combines history and wood working. He plans to go back for an in-depth tour.
     
  7. giradman

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    We have not been to the Winkler Bakery in a while - just a few pics below of the brick oven used w/ some descriptive information (Source) - the oven is heated until the bricks are white hot (about 600 degrees F) - the bread is baked first (the oven can handle over 90 loaves), followed by the sugar cake, and then the cookies. We've already gone through nearly a tin of the ginger cookies and half a tin of the sugar ones - impossible to resist! :) Dave
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  8. scifan57

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    If the Moravians had agreed to allow what is now Old Salem to become the new county seat, the modern downtown would have been on the site of historic Old Salem and an important piece of American history would have been lost.
     
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  9. giradman

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    Apparently, the tours take 90 minutes minimum to view the nearly 10 rooms - Susan would not make it through (she has been a good sport over the decades visiting old houses, etc.), so one day I'll scheduled a tour and go myself. :) Dave
     
  10. giradman

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    Hi Scifan.. - thanks for your continued interest in my threads - kind of starting w/ part two of this one.

    Concerning your question, who knows - similar to the restoration of Colonial Williamsburg, Old Salem was saved and is thriving w/ plenty of private citizens restoring these houses to their colonial historic appearances (but w/ modern inside conveniences - both a non-profit & public effort.

    Now if Salem had become the county seat, I suspect the needed governmental buildings, e.g. the courthouse, might have been built somewhere adjacent to Old Salem, whether to the current location of downtown W-S, impossible for me to say - there are extensive archives on Old Salem, so maybe there had been some discussion back then? Dave :)
     

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