Winston-Salem and Triad North Carolina

Discussion in 'Travel Stories' started by giradman, Jun 14, 2016.

  1. scifan57

    scifan57
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    Thanks for another very interesting snippet of local history. Does any of the original road still exist?
     
  2. giradman

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    Great Wagon Road - Philadelphia to Augusta, GA

    The Great Wagon Road extended 700 miles from Pennsylvania, through Virginia & the Carolinas, and onto Augusta, Georgia (which is on the Savannah River). Most of the road paralleled some of the current major highways (such as I-81 through the Shenandoah Valley in Virginia - a favorite trip for us) and the smaller highways; also the road has been converted into many current highways, if interested check the link in the section quote below - there is a 'segment to segment' description.

    Finally, "today, it is possible to experience many segments of the old road by car, by bike, or even on foot. Although most of the road has seen profound changes, some areas retain scenery much as the pioneers encountered it." (Source second quote).

    Just a few pics below - the first a map showing the route of the Great Wagon Road; the second, an old photo of wagons on a portion of the road in North Carolina; and finally, a couple of pics of exploration of the remnants of the road in the Winston-Salem area (source given in the first quote below - a short but excellent read). Dave :)

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  3. scifan57

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    Thanks for the extra information.
     
  4. giradman

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    Bethabara - First Moravian Settlement in the Triad - 1753

    In 1752, the Wachovia Tract in Piedmont North Carolina was purchased on behalf of the Moravians from the Earl of Granville and consisted of 100,000 acres (see first map below); the first community was established at Bethabara in 1753 (Wiki quotes below & second map showing the geographic relationship of this first town to the other two Moravian communities relative to modern roads - all are w/i a 10-15 minute drive from my home). The name Bethabara is considered the site where Jesus was baptized, as stated below.

    Bethabara was meant to be just a temporary settlement until a more 'appropriate' place in the Tract was found, which was Salem, started in 1766. Wachovia "is the Latin form of the German "die Wachau, was chosen as the name of the North Carolina Moravian tract, to honor Count Zinzendorf, Moravian patron and bishop whose family estate was located in the Wachau region northwest of Vienna, along the Danube River. Our local bank for many years was Wachovia which was taken over by Wells Fargo, just as our Piedmont Airlines was purchased and became part of the USAir Group.

    Bethabara is now a historic site and city park - the next two pics are a park map and an aerial view w/ important attractions labelled. The next four images show some of the buildings on the site, archeological ruins (still being studied), and the community gardens. The cemetery for these early Moravian communities was high on a hill (a strenuous walk for oldsters as seen below) - the last pics are views of God's Acre, a serene & pleasant place to relax; their are miles of easy and more strenuous trails in the park. Dave :)

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  5. giradman

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    Bethania - First Planned Moravian Community in the Triad - 1759!

    Bethania was established in 1759 just three miles from Bethabara - both the latter and then Salem were run on a communal system of common house keeping and labor; 'Single Sisters' lived together in one house and 'Single Brothers' in another, while a number of married couples shared a house - the community was carefully structured. Apparently some of the Moravians wanted a 'different' arrangement, such as owning their own homes and running their lives independently rather than as a communal effort.

    Quoted below some more historic and current information on Bethania - the first four images below show several road plaques and the visitor's center, followed by pics of a number of restored houses and other buildings - the 'Bethania Mill & Village Shoppes' was indeed an old grain mill now converted into shops, offices, and the Muddy Creek & Music Venue, where usually local talent appears - I've not gone yet but Susan has attended several musical events (her guitar teachers, past & present, appear occasionally) - Dave :)

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  6. suenc

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    The hotel is impressive. The food was really good, although more of a “special occasion” restaurant than an everyday choice, since excellent food definitely comes with a price tag.
     
  7. giradman

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    Moravian Religion - Origins & Triad Relationship

    Before continuing on to Salem (now called 'Old Salem') which will be multiple posts, a little information about the Moravian Church (all quotes below from the same link). At the end of the medieval era (roughly 1450), the tenets & practices of the Catholic Church were being questioned, especially by their own priests; an early 'complainer' was John Hus(s) (see first quote below) - his protests did not go well and he was burned at the stake in 1415. By the mid-1400s, the Moravian Church emerged as a Protestant alternate to the Catholic religion - note that this was over a half century before Martin Luther and the more familiar 'Protestant Reformation.'

    However, those early Moravians were persecuted and some killed for their 'new beliefs' - eventually, many fled from Bohemia & Wachovia, and found the patronage of Count Nicholas von Zinzendorf on his vast estate in the early 1700s w/ the establishment of the town of Herrnhut - from that location, Zinzendorf and his close colleagues sent 'brothers & sisters' to foreign places to spread their word - in the American colonies (and after a Georgia failure), Bethlehem was founding in the early 1740s, followed by the exploration into the North Carolina Piedmont in the 1750s, to the eventual establishment of the Moravian communities here - Zinzendorf chose the name Salem and was instrumental in its planning. Dave :)

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  8. suenc

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    We have been in W-S since 1971. When we arrived there was very little seafood, period.
    The cocktail was a Pimm’s Cup with lemon Pimms, strawberry, cucumber and ginger ale. Actually, the pot pie didn’t really have a pound of lobster. It was the meat from a 1-lb lobster. Yummy!
     
  9. giradman

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    Susan has chimed in about her cocktail & lobster pie! Now, I'm not sure 'how much' lobster was in that pie - I'm assuming that it was the meat from a half 1 1/4" or 1 1/2" lobster - a one pound lobster (believe the minimal size allowable) would yield only 3-4 oz of meat - see some FAQs below - Dave :)
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  10. giradman

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    Old Salem - Part I

    In 1766, construction of Salem started and the first people from Bethabara moved to the 'new' town in 1772 - in 1950, the restoration of Salem which was renamed Old Salem began seriously - the restoration and archeologic investigations continue to this day. The restored and rebuilt structures have a variety of ownerships, including private residencies (I've been in several - look like old colonial buildings from the outside, but have all of the modern conveniences inside). Below are a number of quotes from the same Wiki source - if staying in or near Winston-Salem, this would be my number one tourist visit suggestion.

    The first images below show the location of Old Salem (now just south of Business 40) - this year is our 250th anniversary of the start of Salem. The 'Guide Map' is very detailed and many sites will be discussed here and in later posts - there are several streets to explore and many buildings w/ costumed guides and interpreters. The start of a visit is at the center shown below, which contains the wonderful restored Tannenberg Organ (David Tannenberg, 1728–1804, was a Moravian organ builder cited as the most important American organ-builder of his time). The Old Salem guidebook is excellent w/ plenty of pics. The last images show the Home Moravian Church and Salem Academy & Salem College - other images of Main Street looking towards the modern Winston-Salem downtown and the famous 'Coffee Pot' built as an advertisement - more to follow - Dave :)

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