Insurance company sold my ipad on eBay with all my data on it!

Discussion in 'iPad General Discussions' started by peterw47, Sep 11, 2014.

  1. peterw47

    peterw47
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    Hi all, I think this may be the first time I've posed on here but been a member for a while. If it is my first post, hello!

    I've got a bit of an issue with an insurance company for my ipad. Basically my ipad got submerged in water and stopped working, got on phone to insurance company who deal with personal devices, phones, laptops etc. I actually had to send it to their nominated external company who then investigate and issue replacements etc. I got a replacement ipad so all was good.

    However after 2 months I had a call from a random guy who's basically bought a non-working ipad from eBay and managed to get it working. When he's dried it out or what ever he done, it's switched back on in the same state I left it when it broke in first place. This is obviously not good with all my data compromised. I didn't have a password set either.

    The guy found my mobile number on the ipad somehow and we managed to remotely wipe it but by this time he'd already said he's connected it to laptop so for all I know there could be some kind of backup saved now or something. Fair play to the guy so far, I'm sure it could have been worse!

    This has got to be a massive breach of data protection on behalf of the insurance company and/or their nominated repair/replacement company. What can I do about it? I'm fully expecting some kind of compensation and surely this needs some kind of legal case. If nothing more than it could be happening to hundreds of people!

    Any info or advice would be greatly appreciated :)

    Cheers

    Pete
     
  2. twerppoet

    twerppoet
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    The first thing 'I' would suggest is contacting the company and laying out your complaint. Give them a chance to make it right, but do it in a way that can be tracked. Either save the emails, or use regular certified mail. The second is probably the best.

    Then go from there.

    But, if I was really serious, I'd consult a lawyer first.

    But, I'd be unlikely to be serious. If were me (a rather lazy person), I'd send a letter of complaint, then drop the matter. My main concern would be to inform the company that they probably have a rouge employee who is illegally re-selling stuff.

    The chances of you getting enough money back on something like this, enough to compensate for going to court, is minute.
     

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