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The "Anything Goes" thread

addiosamigo

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Amy0x said:
Not the devil horse.

It's called swys and you get the first picture free... They are 59p after that :) great fun!

I'm on the books one, but it's not working right, I think? Like the kite, that's kite runner yeah? I put that and it just beeps at me. The button, the curious case, apparently not?

How do you play it? Lol
 

Amy0x

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addiosamigo said:
I'm on the books one, but it's not working right, I think? Like the kite, that's kite runner yeah? I put that and it just beeps at me. The button, the curious case, apparently not?

How do you play it? Lol

You have to write it correctly. So it would be - the kite runner :) it flashes orange if it's close and red if not a chance of it being that :)
 

Tim SPRACKLEN

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Morning everybody.

And I guess the weather is better with you than it is in Scotland!!

Tim

75degrees an 10% chance of rain right now.

I've been watching the Shuttle Endeavor and International Space Station space walk activity all morning on the NASA app. Stunning stuff. They have cameras mounted in their space suit helmets - truly riveting viewing.

I am a child of the Mercury/Gemini/Apollo era; it was the US Space Program that convinced me, as a child, to study science and engineering. I'm very sad there's only one more Shuttle launch left.

To land a man on the moon in 1969 using a lunar lander with a computer with 32K of memory and a Mission Control computer with just 128K. I visited the Johnson Space Centre in Houston last year and saw the original Apollo Mission Control room - very nostalgic....

OK - back to my iPad with 64GB of memory....

Tim
 

addiosamigo

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Amy0x said:
You have to write it correctly. So it would be - the kite runner :) it flashes orange if it's close and red if not a chance of it being that :)

Yeah I did that, the kite runner, kite runner, kiterunner nothing works. And the curious case of Benjamin button etc not working! You done this one??
 
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robertlc

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And I guess the weather is better with you than it is in Scotland!!

Tim

75degrees an 10% chance of rain right now.

I've been watching the Shuttle Endeavor and International Space Station space walk activity all morning on the NASA app. Stunning stuff. They have cameras mounted in their space suit helmets - truly riveting viewing.

I am a child of the Mercury/Gemini/Apollo era; it was the US Space Program that convinced me, as a child, to study science and engineering. I'm very sad there's only one more Shuttle launch left.

To land a man on the moon in 1969 using a lunar lander with a computer with 32K of memory and a Mission Control computer with just 128K. I visited the Johnson Space Centre in Houston last year and saw the original Apollo Mission Control room - very nostalgic....

OK - back to my iPad with 64GB of memory....

Tim

I've been to the Houston, Huntsville and Kenney space centers. And I saw firsthand the third Space Shuttle launch.

I used to work at Stennis Space Center where they tested the Saturn V and Space Shuttle Main Engines. A SSME test is pretty cool to experience.
 

Tim SPRACKLEN

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75degrees an 10% chance of rain right now.

I've been watching the Shuttle Endeavor and International Space Station space walk activity all morning on the NASA app. Stunning stuff. They have cameras mounted in their space suit helmets - truly riveting viewing.

I am a child of the Mercury/Gemini/Apollo era; it was the US Space Program that convinced me, as a child, to study science and engineering. I'm very sad there's only one more Shuttle launch left.

To land a man on the moon in 1969 using a lunar lander with a computer with 32K of memory and a Mission Control computer with just 128K. I visited the Johnson Space Centre in Houston last year and saw the original Apollo Mission Control room - very nostalgic....

OK - back to my iPad with 64GB of memory....

Tim

I've been to the Houston, Huntsville and Kenney space centers. And I saw firsthand the third Space Shuttle launch.

I used to work at Stennis Space Center where they tested the Saturn V and Space Shuttle Main Engines. A SSME test is pretty cool to experience.

The Saturn V is a truly amazing piece of American engineering. You simply can't comprehend the scale of it until you stand by the side of just one of the main engines. Those guys that landed on the moon - they were truly brave pioneers in the very best sense of the word. NASA was a great organisation in those days, in my opinion. Kennedy just gave a bunch of really great engineers a blank cheque and said 'Get it done' - and they did, in grand style. I was so sad when the Apollo program was curtailed. I saw NASA had realistic plans during the Apollo era for a manned landing on Mars by 1985 - and I believe they could have done it too. I would have gladly contributed financially to the US Space Program!!

But I'm sure there was a whole generation of people like me who were totally inspired by the moon landings and went on to become scientists and engineers and who created the economic conditions that helped our technological revolution - semiconductors, computers, communications, the Internet.

OK - I'll shut up now....

Tim
 

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Tim SPRACKLEN said:
The Saturn V is a truly amazing piece of American engineering. You simply can't comprehend the scale of it until you stand by the side of just one of the main engines. Those guys that landed on the moon - they were truly brave pioneers in the very best sense of the word. NASA was a great organisation in those days, in my opinion. Kennedy just gave a bunch of really great engineers a blank cheque and said 'Get it done' - and they did, in grand style. I was so sad when the Apollo program was curtailed. I saw NASA had realistic plans during the Apollo era for a manned landing on Mars by 1985 - and I believe they could have done it too. I would have gladly contributed financially to the US Space Program!!

But I'm sure there was a whole generation of people like me who were totally inspired by the moon landings and went on to become scientists and engineers and who created the economic conditions that helped our technological revolution - semiconductors, computers, communications, the Internet.

OK - I'll shut up now....

Tim

It is amazing stuff though Tim. The laws of physics, ( at least as far as our present knowledge goes) prevent us from undertaking a journey long enough to investigate potential life on planets 100's and 1000's of light years away. Should the notion that the speed of light ever change, then we would really be in business. Sadly, not in our lifetime, and probably never. People are just not interested in low Earth orbit projects. The ISS has to be "nudged" into a higher orbit by the shuttle if it has the spare fuel on each mission. With it's sad demise, and no replacement in sight, I guess we look to China for the next moon expedition.

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Tim SPRACKLEN

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Tim SPRACKLEN said:
The Saturn V is a truly amazing piece of American engineering. You simply can't comprehend the scale of it until you stand by the side of just one of the main engines. Those guys that landed on the moon - they were truly brave pioneers in the very best sense of the word. NASA was a great organisation in those days, in my opinion. Kennedy just gave a bunch of really great engineers a blank cheque and said 'Get it done' - and they did, in grand style. I was so sad when the Apollo program was curtailed. I saw NASA had realistic plans during the Apollo era for a manned landing on Mars by 1985 - and I believe they could have done it too. I would have gladly contributed financially to the US Space Program!!

But I'm sure there was a whole generation of people like me who were totally inspired by the moon landings and went on to become scientists and engineers and who created the economic conditions that helped our technological revolution - semiconductors, computers, communications, the Internet.

OK - I'll shut up now....

Tim

It is amazing stuff though Tim. The laws of physics, ( at least as far as our present knowledge goes) prevent us from undertaking a journey long enough to investigate potential life on planets 100's and 1000's of light years away. Should the notion that the speed of light ever change, then we would really be in business. Sadly, not in our lifetime, and probably never. People are just not interested in low Earth orbit projects. The ISS has to be "nudged" into a higher orbit by the shuttle if it has the spare fuel on each mission. With it's sad demise, and no replacement in sight, I guess we look to China for the next moon expedition.

Sent from my iPad using iPF

I was inspired too by a high-school teacher who taught me that there's nothing that we humans cannot do, no problem that we cannot solve. And that belief has been with me for all my life. I worry when we start to doubt our ability to solve problems - his motto was 'it's more dangerous to stand still than to keep on running'

Tim
 

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Tim SPRACKLEN said:
I was inspired too by a high-school teacher who taught me that there's nothing that we humans cannot do, no problem that we cannot solve. And that belief has been with me for all my life. I worry when we start to doubt our ability to solve problems - his motto was 'it's more dangerous to stand still than to keep on running'

Tim

I hope the barriers are broken, in fact.. They have to be Earth's resources are finite, and even with alternative energy sources, the time will come when we just run out. It would be sad to think that the human race is just to fizzle out, or end in anarchy or a return to the dark ages, but this could occur. I think about this kind of thing a lot!

Sent from my iPad using iPF
 

Tim SPRACKLEN

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Tim SPRACKLEN said:
I was inspired too by a high-school teacher who taught me that there's nothing that we humans cannot do, no problem that we cannot solve. And that belief has been with me for all my life. I worry when we start to doubt our ability to solve problems - his motto was 'it's more dangerous to stand still than to keep on running'

Tim

I hope the barriers are broken, in fact.. They have to be Earth's resources are finite, and even with alternative energy sources, the time will come when we just run out. It would be sad to think that the human race is just to fizzle out, or end in anarchy or a return to the dark ages, but this could occur. I think about this kind of thing a lot!

Sent from my iPad using iPF

Don't be so pessimistic. That's the whole point my teacher was trying to make; it's when we doubt our ability to solve the problems that we start getting into trouble. Life is better now than it was at any time in the past. When I was a kid I knew several kids who had polio and who caught diphtheria - who worries about that now? When was the last time you thought about catching a fatal disease? Probably not for quite a time.

When I was a kid too there was a very real danger of nuclear war - but who worries about that now?

Things are better now than they have ever been and they will continue to get better - believe it and don't have any doubt in our ability.

To me it's the electronics revolution that is powering the future. I tell my students that (not quite, but nearly) we can put an almost infinite amount of computational capacity onto a silicon chip, it will consume almost zero power and we can make it for nearly nothing.

So if I give my students a signal processing problem I say to them - don't tell me the technology can't do it, if you tell me you can't do it it's your problem not that of the technology. I can't think of another branch of engineering where you can say that. If I asked you to build a bridge across the Atlantic Ocean you'd quite rightly tell me that it was impossible - technically impossible. But you give me any signal processing problem, any communications problem - if I'm forced to admit defeat it's my limited intellectual capacity that's the issue, not the technology. Basically we can achieve anything we want.

Tim
 
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robertlc

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The space stuff is interesting as I've been following it all my life and at one point worked as a contractor for NASA, writing their news releases and meeting astronauts.


There's something in this thread for everyone!


How are you doing Amy? Catch us up on you.
 

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