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Double negation in English

iDharma

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Two nations still divided by the same language. We need another revolution.

Actually, the pronunciation used in North America today more closely resembles Elizabethan English than does Standard (British) English pronunciation. This is because the Great Vowel Shift resulted in dramatic changes in the way people in southern England speak.

But we Yanks continue to let our British cousins think theirs is the authentic "Queen's English"—just don't ask which Queen... :D {snark}
 

CMFox

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"snarky replies"
Oh dear, that wasn't a rude reply, you misinterpreted my response.
It was an obviously failed attempt at english humour......
Two nations still divided by the same language. We need another revolution.

Sadly written language is sometimes inadequate.
Communications are not just content, but contain tone, gestures and facial expression as well.
I wonder if there is a symbolic notation like choreography which could express the totality.......not a comms specialist so don't know.

Double negatives are just a very lazy way of speaking and generally frowned upon by purists.

I wasn't referring to your reply. I caught the humor. :)
 
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Alling

Alling

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And to make sure no one thinks I'm sad ... I'm not. I haven't been since I started the thread. :)

Once when my friends came home from Denmark after having been on a soccer camp, they talked about the Danes saying rødgrød med fløde and no one knew what it meant or anything. We just thought it sounded so damn funny and awful! :)


I still haven't got any answer on my question about putting punctuation marks inside quotation marks. Somebody?
 

The Alternative

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This will answer your question...
Quotation Marks | Punctuation Rules

By the way, Alling, I have to say that your command of English is better than some Americans that I know. Please don't let the snarky comments keep you from posting. I've enjoyed your topic and since it's in the "Anything Goes" bucket you have every right to post your views.
 

Superbike81

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"I never NARC'd on nobody!"

paul-walker-vin-diesel-fast-furious-2.jpg



:D
 

Photo1017

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Unfortunately, the style of speaking incorrectly has become so widespread as to become standard. I find it quite annoying. It didn't take me long once out of Brooklyn to drop the the brooklynese accent and style!
I've never placed the punctuation inside quotes unless it is part of the quote. It may be correct to put it inside, but that's just wrong.
 
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Alling

Alling

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I still haven't got any answer on my question about putting punctuation marks inside quotation marks. Somebody?

Hey, silly, I answered you. Go back to my original response to you.
Well, here goes my silly response then:

You only explained that the formal way of writing includes putting punctuation marks inside quotation marks, but you didn't explain why or who decided it or when it was established.


I've never placed the punctuation inside quotes unless it is part of the quote. It may be correct to put it inside, but that's just wrong.
I happen to have good knowledge about punctuation in Swedish, and as I previously said, we don't put punctuation marks where they by logic shouldn't be.

What if i write like this in English:

Do you usually use the word "damn"?

Will I be considered strange or sloppy?


Using alternative [wrong] ways of spelling words is common here, too. Commonly used words are being simplified:

Correct --> Wrong (English)
med --> me ("with")
är --> e ("am/are/is")
jag --> ja ("I", but ja means "yes")
kommer --> kmr ("comes")
tillsammans --> tsm ("together")

Many of those "versions" cause critical misunderstandings, but the people using them (often kids) don't realize that; they think everyone automatically knows what they mean.
 
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pallentx

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While the double negative is improper in English, it is proper in some other languages.
In Russian and some Slavic languages, the single negative is actually wrong. With these languages the meaning is less dependent on word order and more tied to the forms of the verbs used.
 

rwilts

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Being an English speaker in the UK I agree with the original observation that the double negative is just poor use of language.

For many years I have intentionally annoyed co workers with my answers when they say

Q ."You don't have a spare pen do you?"
R . "Yes"
Q ."Great can i borrow it?
R . "No, i have not got one!"

Obviously an example my day is not made up of being asked for pens.
 

devehrey

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iPadforums might not be dedicated to discussing linguistics, but I think you guys can answer my questions.

I've always wondered why many, if not all, English-speaking people use double negations in cases where Swedish-speaking people only use one negation.

Examples, negations marked in red:

English: "I didn't do nothing!"
Swedish: "I did nothing!" or "I didn't do anything!"

English: "I've never killed no one!"
Swedish: "I've never killed anyone!"

To me, the English way of saying it seems to mean that the person actually DID something or DID kill someone. Why isn't "I didn't do anything!" and "I've never killed anyone!" the common way to defend one's innocence?

Does it sound strange to say "I didn't do anything?" Does it mean something else?

Is there a difference between British and American English?


By the way, why do English-speaking people usually put punctuation marks such as the blue question mark inside the quotation mark? It does not belong to the quotation. And that's the case in English books too. Swedish people would write: Does it sound strange to say "I didn't do anything"?

Yes. That's been widespread in hollywood movies, especially with the hippies cast. They think that's cool. But they aren't aware that they're destroying their language. And for your concern between the difference in British and American English, yes,there is.
 
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Alling

Alling

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Speaking of difference between UK and US English, I watched Harry Potter and the Chamber of Secrets recently. I'm also currently reading the books in (American) English, and I've been wondering about Hagrid's dialect. Does he speak American English or just some odd British dialect? :p

And speaking of English in general, the thing that haunts me most is prepositions. I think they're difficult to learn in any language (in Swedish we would say "on any language," for example). Gaah! :D
 
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Imspartacus

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iPadforums might not be dedicated to discussing linguistics, but I think you guys can answer my questions.

I've always wondered why many, if not all, English-speaking people use double negations in cases where Swedish-speaking people only use one negation.

Examples, negations marked in red:

English: "I didn't do nothing!"
Swedish: "I did nothing!" or "I didn't do anything!"

English: "I've never killed no one!"
Swedish: "I've never killed anyone!"

To me, the English way of saying it seems to mean that the person actually DID something or DID kill someone. Why isn't "I didn't do anything!" and "I've never killed anyone!" the common way to defend one's innocence?

Does it sound strange to say "I didn't do anything?" Does it mean something else?

Is there a difference between British and American English?


By the way, why do English-speaking people usually put punctuation marks such as the blue question mark inside the quotation mark? It does not belong to the quotation. And that's the case in English books too. Swedish people would write: Does it sound strange to say "I didn't do anything"?

Your so called Swedish way of saying it is the proper way of speaking and i'm an english speaking person. In fact English is the only spoken language that I know. I think the problem is just that there are a lot of english speaking idiots.


Yup i agree im english 100% and the english speaking idiots are often called scallies or chavs. laziness do you not think?
 

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