With the improved GPU/CPU...

Discussion in 'iPad 2 Forum' started by kevbo, Mar 12, 2011.

  1. kevbo

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    So, the CPU is technically twice as fast and Apple claims that the GPU is nine (?) times as fast as the original iPad. Given this massive increase, will there be apps, and specifically games, that will take advantage of the iPad 2's power? My reason for asking is that, if these numbers are correct, there will surely be games that will be nearly unplayable on the iPad 1 if they push the limits of the iPad 2. However, Apple has been critical of the Android Market because of fragmentation, which would be an issue if there were unplayable games/very slow apps (especially graphics intensive, but others as well) available in the App Store that are meant for the iPad 2.

    I just can't see this happening, as Apple doesn't allow refunds and there would be some people who would be very upset about this. But I bought the iPad 2 primarily because of the performance increase and I would be upset if games/apps didn't take full advantage of this power because of Apple's insistence on not fragmenting the App Store.

    I understand that Apple's criticism of the "fragmentation" of the Android Market is a bit different from what I'm talking about, but I would argue that this is also fragmentation.
     
  2. dmaul1114

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    I think the vast majority of Apps will be designed to run on both the iPad 1 and 2.

    There are too many iPad 1's out there for developers to ignore that market. So they'll go lowest common denominator and make most things run fine on both machines--just like most apps run fine on both the iPhone 4 and iPhone 3Gs.
     
  3. kevbo

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    I understand that reasoning, and certainly most apps aren't very dependent on performance anyway. But this is also what I was afraid of, because what is the point of having an iPad that is so fast when apps won't take advantage of it? I mean, really, there is no point at all, except that maybe it can output movies at 1080p instead of 720p, which is hardly a big deal at all. I'm not complaining, as I'm not sure what the future will hold, but I definitely am hoping that apps will expand into more advanced functionality considering that iPad apps are quite basic right now.
     
  4. dmaul1114

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    Very true. That's why I've told people that if they didn't want the Camera's or more intensive apps like iMovie, then there is little reason to upgrade at this point.

    Probably not worth it for faster web page loading etc. if you're not one that needs the cameras or will use the more resource intensive apps.

    Most people are just surfing the net, doing e-mail, using news apps etc. No reasons to upgrade yearly if you have those kind of basic uses.
     
  5. tzimisce

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    I think Apple apps are just fine the way they are right now - not quite sure what you mean exactly by "more advanced functionality". If common experience is anything to go by looking at the way programs tend to get bigger with each iteration, that's just another way of saying "bloatware with features that 99.9% of us don't care, need or use."
     
  6. Hasty

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    The added power and ram will allow developers to create more sophisticated and complex apps. For example Garage Band and iMovie.
    Firemint with new racing game was made with these improvements in mind, and check out the difference between Infinities Blade on the original iPad and iPad 2 on Anandtech's website. The graphical differences are instantly noticeable.
    This is only the beginning.
     
  7. Teacher's Pet

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    I think that developers will start taking advantage of the added power. I don't game a lot on the iPad, but I run a ton of apps. I just run more apps that would be considered more for business use and for productivity. For example, a lot of the apps I use are for marking up and making annotations on blueprints in .PDF form, using apps like Steel HD for reference and calculations, saving and editing documents and spreadsheets from email attachments, etc... I use the iPad at home but it's mostly reading, being on the forums, and doing research online.

    At school I use it to take all my notes and record audio of the lectures, access and read my text books in digital format, etc...

    I think developers of both games and productivity, as well as media apps, will take advantage of the power increase with more sophisticated and complex apps. We all know what to say when people ask "Should I get rid of my computer and get an iPad?" I think apps will continue to increase in their ability to perform more complex tasks. I don't expect the iPad will ever be able to do everything we can do on a PC or Mac, but I think it will continue to take on more and more tasks that we currently rely on desktop or notebook computers for.

    The new Real Racing 2 HD game claims to take advantage of the additional processor and GPU power. Reviews are stating that it runs pretty good on the first iPad. They set their game up to use the increased power of the iPad 2, and some of the features are disabled when installed on the first iPad. Unless a huge problem comes up with this style of design, I think a lot of developers will follow suit.
     
    #7 Teacher's Pet, Mar 13, 2011
    Last edited: Mar 13, 2011
  8. Seadog

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    Apps will be designed to work in two modes when possible. It will be the same experience, just a little bit fancier for iPad 2.
     
  9. kevbo

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    That's what I like to hear. I didn't realize that games may actually have better graphics on the iPad 2 vs iPad 1.

    By more advanced functionality, I'm saying that, for example, the photo editing software I've seen is very, very basic compared to something like Photoshop. To that, you may ask if I really expect a full featured Photoshop to come to iPad. I would answer that I do expect that eventually. I love the tablet form factor and I hope that it will actually replace laptops someday in the near future. However, it will only replace laptops if the limits are pushed with every update. I'm sure mainstream PC consumers over the last 30 years would have loved to not have to upgrade every couple of years, but having to upgrade is the reason why our applications are as advanced as they are. If Apple doesn't allow developers to push the hardware of the iPad 2, the catering to the least common denominator will hinder this advancement. It's hard to make a comparison, but I'd say that the iPad 2's hardware is at least as good as relatively high end computers ~7 years ago, which could run Photoshop 4 with ease.
     
  10. tzimisce

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    Yes and no. It does depend on how developers design their software upgrades, and how much they "bloat up" between iterations.

    Given that I've been using fully-fledged photo editing software on Win 98/early XP platforms which, without even looking, I'm pretty confident my iPad easily outspecs in terms of PC hardware and performance, it is viable that a quite comprehensive photo-editing suite could be produced which would work even on iPad 1. I think the challenge of building photo-editing software lies in not having a mouse+cursor with its mouseover, drag, hover, etc, states that aren't as easily replicated with fingers.
     

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