Recharge Issue

Discussion in 'iPad General Discussions' started by ForgotMyUsername, Dec 28, 2015.

  1. ForgotMyUsername

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    Every night I plug in my iPad 2 to recharge. Lately I notice that overnight gives me 60-70% only. My battery is running down it appears. Is this normal? Can it be fixed? I'd hate to recharge for 24+ hours to use it.
     
  2. alexm1

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    Let the battery completely run out before recharging, this will "reset" the zero point and should resolve your problem.
     
  3. LannyC

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    Force-close all your apps, and reset your iPad by holding both power and Home buttons in until it restarts. Then try an overnight charge.

    Also, it's useful every so often to run the battery down to 10-20%, then charge overnight. This recalibrates the battery charge calculator for more accurate values.
     
  4. giradman

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    Hello - your iPad 2 was released in 2011, now approaching 5 years of age - Li-Ion batteries age - not sure 'how old' the one in your device may be depending on its date of production - please follow the previous excellent suggestions - if you are still having a problem, then you might want to obtain one of a number of apps that can measure your iPad's battery status - one is Battery Health, available in the iPad app store - see pic below and connected red arrow which gives the over health of the battery (just a ratio of the two amperages immediately below) and the number of cycles your battery has experienced - at 1000 cycles your battery should maintain only 80% or less of it original capacity.

    Another option is Coconut Battery, a simple app for an iMac that can asses not only a laptop's battery, but also that of an iDevice when the latter is plugged in - let us know your results. Dave :)

    P.S. if indeed your battery is 'dying', then Apple charges $99 for doing a replacement - if your are a DIY, then the cost w/ be cheaper but require opening of your iPad (not an easy chore); finally, you should be considering obtaining a new iPad - the difference between my 2011 iPad 2 and my now one-year old iPad Air 2 is 'night and day.'
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  5. Brian 244

    Brian 244
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    First things first, inspect your charger and cable for damage. Try another known working charger and cable if you can. Also check your charge connector on the bottom of the iPad for debris or damage. If this doesn't solve your issue, you can look at a battery replacement or replacing the iPad.
     
  6. Wing rider

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    The method mentioned by alexm1 is what I've used in the past with laptop batteries with some but not 100% success. It's time consuming but I suppose if you ran the screen brightness up all the way and played lots of music it would drain the battery a little faster.

    Or as already mentioned, it may be time for a new battery.

    Back in the early days of cordless drills you had to run the batteries down all the way before recharging them else they'd develop a false memory of the charge state.
     
  7. giradman

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    Just for clarification about the statement in bold above - I'm assuming that the poster is referring to the older Ni-Cd Battery Technology - I'm an amateur woodworker and had plenty of cordless tools powered w/ these older type batteries, a pain not only because of the 'memory issue' but also the quick depletion of power - I'd hate to go to the workshop after a few months absence and find that I had to recharge all of my batteries - UGHH!

    Well, ALL of my cordless tools (probably a dozen or more) now have Li-Ion batteries which are the ones in the iDevices under discussion - this newer technology does not have these problems, BUT as suggested about once a month or so, the battery should be exhausted to about 10% or less and then fully recharged - the issue is solely to recalibrate the proper percentage of charge and not for the problems w/ the Ni-Cd batteries - I DO enjoy going to my shop now and finding my cordless tools ready to go even after weeks of absence - ;) Dave
     
  8. Wing rider

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    Exactly, and it was such old technology that the batteries were made of stone and the instructions for that old Milwaukee cordless drill were written on papyrus scrolls. It was an early model.:D
     
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  9. giradman

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    Yep - as I suspected! :D Now, I must have 7-8 cordless tools in my shop and all running on Li-Ion batteries - just hope none will catch on fire or blow up! :eek: ;) Dave
     

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