On this day in history.

Discussion in 'Off-Topic' started by KevinJS, Aug 3, 2012.

  1. giradman

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    Rick Hall of Muscle Shoals & FAME Recording Studio Died Yesterday at 85 years of age!

    Nearly 4 years ago, Susan & I took a trip to northern Alabama (Florence on the Tennessee River, Muscle Shoals on the other side) and Nashville (my travelogue HERE - we visited the famous FAME Studios founded by Rick Hall (short bio first quote below - check link for more) - the tour of the studio was excellent (the other members in the group were a father and 2 sons from Germany). A few pics below; also, check and expand the second quote copied from my travelogue. Finally, if interested in this American period of music the documentary on Muscle Shoals is worth watching and highly recommended (own the blu-ray disc). Dave :)
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  2. giradman

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    Today in 1838, Samuel Morse First Demonstrated His Telegraph!

    On this day in 1838, Samuel F.B. Morse (1791-1872) demonstrated his telegraph for the first time in Morristown, NJ. Morse was a painter first and then an inventor of a device that revolutionized long-distance communications - much more below and from the link.

    Pics below include some on his paintings (his self-portrait, several early USA Presidents and his famous Gallery of the Lourve, which I saw recently at a Reynold House exhibit - in one of my travelogues); also several photos of him in later years by Mathew Brady; and other images of some of his honors and recognition. Dave :)

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  3. scifan57

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    January 15, 1967;

    The NFL champion Green Bay Packers defeat the AFL champion Kansas City Chiefs 35-10 in the first world championship game of American football. The championship game wasn't called the Super Bowl until the 1969 championship game.
    Super Bowl I - Wikipedia

    SuperBowl_I_-_Los_Angeles_Coliseum.jpg
     
    #2443 scifan57, Jan 15, 2018
    Last edited: Jan 15, 2018
  4. giradman

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    Brothers & I use to watch those early Super Bowls - we loved the 'Green Bay Packers' w/ Bart Starr and the gang; also, saw the 'Jets vs. Colts' game when Joe Namath became an overnight star! Dave :)
     
  5. scifan57

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    The YouTube video I linked to was assembled by NBC from well over a hundred clips from various sources to get as close a version to the compete game as possible. The original broadcast tapes were erased years ago.
     
  6. giradman

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    Ft. Fisher in North Carolina Falls in 1865 & Closes the Confederate Port of Wilmington

    On this day in 1865, Fort Fisher in North Carolina falls to Union forces, and Wilmington, North Carolina, the Confederacy’s most important blockade-running port, is closed. In two posts at the link below (my Carolina coastal travelogue) - the first post is quoted below (follow the link for the second post w/ some great photos); also, a LOT more in that thread on activities in the Wilmington area. Dave :)

    Carolina Shore - Ocean, Seafood, History & More!

    Fort Fisher - Gibraltar of the South

    Fort Fisher was just one fortification that protected the two inlets to the Cape Fear River and to the port of Wilmington about 30 miles upstream (see maps for others, especially at the 'Old Inlet'). The aerial views below show the remnants of the northern earthen works of Ft. Fisher, which was much larger and 7-shaped during the Civil War, and protected both a land and sea assault to the 'New Inlet' of the river; much of the sea-side portion of the structure has disappeared because of sea erosion over the last century and a half.

    The importance of Wilmington is discussed in the first quote below - blockade running was crucial to the Confederate economy and its military, especially to Robert E. Lee's army. Ft. Fisher was an earthen fort w/ mounds of dirt/sand which effectively absorbed attempts at bombardment. The Union made two attempts to capture the fort, one aborted in December 1864; and a second in January 1865 which was effective - a combined naval bombardment and land assault led to the surrender of Ft. Fisher; the fighting was fierce, particularly around Shepherd's Battery and the Wilmington Road - there were a combined 2000 casualties. Wilmington fell in February 1865 and Lee surrendered at Appomattox in mid-April (see second quote).

    Pics below - the fourth through sixth images are my own; Shepherd's Battery is open to the public (but was closed during our visit - likely storm damage from hurricane Matthew); a couple of maps of the Confederate fortifications of the times and also the Union attack from the land. Finally, guided tours are available - the final pic is of a book I bought in the gift shop; the author was about to give a tour (wish we had signed up) - he is a PhD professor of history at the University of NC at Wilmington - kind of a neat fortuitous meeting - NOW, I need to read the book (but not that long and a LOT of pictures). Dave

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  7. J. A.

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  8. giradman

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    Benny Goodman at Carnegie Hall This Night in 1938!

    Benny Goodman was 28 years old when he, his band/quartet, and other guest jazz artists performed at Carnegie Hall today in 1938 - the concert made jazz history and Goodman was labeled the King of Swing - for more information check the link and quotes. First pic below of Goodman in his mid-30s; second image of the Goodman Quartet, all members going on to lead their own bands and become jazz legends - Goodman made Trio, Quartet, and Sextet recordings, i.e. chamber jazz - which have been remastered well and are worth hearing.

    I own nearly a dozen Goodman CDs, BUT not one of the Carnegie Hall Concert (have some excerpts) which is available (below) - a YouTube video of concert footage is worth a watch (just 8+ minutes) - my most recent audio acquisition is the 2-disc 'The Essential Benny Goodman' for those wanting a sampling. Over the years, I've read a number of books about the Swing Era and Benny Goodman - Swing, Swing, Swing shown below from 1993 is excellent and one that has remained in my collection. Finally, there is a 1955 bioptic film on Goodman w/ Steve Allen playing Benny (not very well) - however, the 'real' Goodman played the clarinet passages and many of his former band members were in the cast - the music is indeed excellent, so the latter are the main reasons to watch this movie - I own the DVD and would love to see a remastered BD which would emphasize the musical tracks. Dave :)



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  9. giradman

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    Robert E. Lee Born This Day in 1807!

    Robert E. Lee (1807-1870) considered part of 'Virginia Aristocracy' w/ a remarkable American family pedigree, especially the relationships of his father, George Washington, and wife, Mary Anna Custis (who grew up in the Arlington House where nearly all of her children w/ Lee were born) - see quote below and check link for more information on Lee's career (first combo pic of Lee as a young and older officer).

    About eight years ago on one of our many trips to Richmond, Virginia, we took a day trip to the Potomac River and the birthplaces of George Washington and Robert E. Lee (only a 15-minute drive between the two locations - see map). The George Washington Birthplace National Monument is located at the confluence of Popes Creek and the Potomac River - the original house was lost but the foundation remains (see pic); a 'Memorial House' was built in the style of a tobacco plantation house of the times - below a pic of Susan in front of the Memorial House.

    Robert E. Lee was born at Stratford Hall, a large plantation house and home to many Lees over a number of generations - below are my pic of the back of the house and also a panoramic view from the link. For those interested, check my Virginia and Civil War travelogues for posts about Richmond, Lee, and other related stories. Dave :)

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  10. scifan57

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    I visited her tomb in the Henry VII chapel at Westminster Abbey when I was in London in 2014.
     

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