On this day in history.

Discussion in 'Off-Topic' started by KevinJS, Aug 3, 2012.

  1. giradman

    giradman
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    Well, same experience here in trying to see the Rosetta Stone; although, I must say that viewing the Mona Lisa at the Louvre in Paris was even more irritating - pic below of a crowd at a distance from the rather small Da Vinci painting - and a quote & pic from another visitor stating that the experience was 'thoroughly unpleasant' (my bolding) - gave me a chuckle! :D Dave

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  2. giradman

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    Neil Armstrong Walks on Moon Today in 1969!

    Nearly 50 years ago now, Neil Armstrong was the first man to walk on the moon - I was in medical school and watched the event on TV in a friend's apartment in Ann Arbor - just a thrilling moment - see first quote below and the first three pics.

    Earlier this year, Susan & I saw a new film below (which I've already bought as a BD), Hidden Figures about Katherine Johnson and her colleagues who were the 'human computers' at the time for the US space program - a few quotes and pics of her also at the end below - in 2015, she received the Presidential Medal of Freedom from President Obama, the highest honor the US Government can award to a civilian (kind of like the equivalent of the Medal of Honor) - highly recommend the film - Dave :)

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  3. scifan57

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    It was just a few days before my 12th birthday when the first manned Lunar landing happened. My parents let me stay up most of the night to watch it live as it happened.

    The boots that made those historic first footprints on another planetary body are still on the Moon, along with the backpacks and hasselblad cameras. Only the film magazines ere brought back to Earth. All this was to lighten the load as much as possible to be able to bring back as many Lunar rocks and soil samples as possible. I think they should have made an exception for Neil Armstrong’s boots, after all mankind can set foot on another world for the first time only once.
     
  4. giradman

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    Machu Picchu Discovered This Day in 1911

    Machu Picchu is located high in the Peruvian Andes Mountains (nearly 8,000 ft), and may have been a 'mountain retreat' for Incan royalty (Source). The site was discovered this day in 1911 by the American archeologist, Hiram Bingham (pics of him below and one early photo on the town). Now a commonly visited tourist site w/ easier access, however, back in the early 20th century (possibly 1930s), my wife's grandmother (Dr. Rita Finkler, who loved to travel) visited the place and likely had to walk and ride an animal of some type to reach the place. Other pics below of the current appearance of Machu Picchu, plus a 50+ minute video worth a watch for those interested.

    In the late 70s/early 80s, Susan and I almost planned a trip to Peru, mainly to visit these Incan ruins, but we never went, much to my regret (too old now! ;)) - I've had an interest in anthropology and the pre-Columbian American civilizations since my college days and have read many books on the subject over the decades. In 1972, we did a 2-week trip to Mexico and visited a number of Mayan ruins on the Yucatan Peninsula and also just outside of Mexico City. Dave :)



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  5. giradman

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    Banting & Best Isolate Insulin in Toronto this day in 1921!

    Nearly a hundred years ago, Frederick Banting & Charles Best isolated insulin, the pancreatic hormone crucial in regulating blood sugar and important in understanding and treating diabetes, when needed - many other options have become available since my days in medical school. Just 2 years after this announcement, Banting and John MacLeod were awarded the Nobel Prize in Medicine & Physiology, the short time emphasizing the importance of this discovery. Dave :)

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  6. scifan57

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    I’m wondering why Charles Best wasn’t included in the Nobel Prize. MacLeod was actually on vacation when Banting and Best first isolated insulin.
     
    #2346 scifan57, Jul 27, 2017
    Last edited: Jul 27, 2017
  7. giradman

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    My thoughts too - a couple quotes below from Best's Wiki Article - seems that Best was just a young medical student who assisted Banting; MacLeod oversaw Banting's work and also added James Collip to the 'team' to help 'isolate' insulin - seems like the Nobel committee decided to honor just Banting & MacLeod, although both recognized the contributions of Best & Collip and shared their prize money. I'd rather have had my name as a recipient of the Nobel - Dave :)

     
  8. scifan57

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    August 2, 1776;

    Members of Congress affix their signatures to an enlarged copy of the Declaration of Independance.
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  9. giradman

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    Full story below (Source) - for those interested, check link for some other facts about the document - Dave :)

     
  10. giradman

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    USS Nautilus Travelled Undersea Beneath the North Pole Ice Cap in 1958!

    The USS Nautilus, the first nuclear submarine was launched in 1954, and four years later travelled nearly 1600 nautical miles about 500 feet undersea beneath the polar ice cap - with the disappearing Arctic Sea ice from global warming, this feat may not be an option in the near future? Dave :)

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