Is Using TruTone and Nightshift sorta redundant?

Discussion in 'iPad Pro Forum' started by Reddrob97, Apr 11, 2016.

  1. Reddrob97

    Reddrob97
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    I can see using night shift on my IPhone 6 Plus, as it has no TruTone technology. However on the IPad Pro, should I enable TruTone only or both tru tone and night shift? Why are both an option on the iPad Pro? I read somewhere night shift muddies up the tru tone effect. Or that they somehow conflict with each other? If tru tone is looking for ambient light temperature in the room, would that even work if night shift is already making things yellowish or warm in the evening hours. Let's say the room were mostly blue light at night? Maybe I'm thinking about it too much here? I can say that with tru tone enabled alone, my are just comfortable during daytime hours. But perhaps night shift will help me transition into slumber on both my iPhone and iPad Pro.
     
  2. twerppoet

    twerppoet
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    TrueTone mimics the white balance of the enviroment. It's purpose is to make the iPad's screen seem more natural, more in tune with the colors arround you. Besides looking nice it is also a potential boon to artists and photographers who are trying to accurately reproduce colors.

    Night Shift forces the white balance to the warm side of the spectrum. It does not care about color accuracy, just the reduction of blue light, and the probable sleep benifits.

    TrueTone should work as a substitute for NightShift if your envirioment is already warmly lit. A reduction of blue light in your enviroment should reduce the blue light coming from the iPad. Hold in mind this is about balance, not intensity. Low light is not the same as warm lighting.

    Since Night Shift forces a warm balance, reguarless of the enviroment, it will override TrueTone when active, resulting in less accurate colors.
     
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  3. sjleworthy

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    i find TrueTone the latest gadget gimmick. i can see where the average user might like it and where it might 'look cool' and give the best all round optimum screen gamut, but as an artist and photographer i find this an option completely and utterly useless. the idea of the device making up it's own mind where and when my white balance should be effected, especially when in a professional situation is infuriating and hopeless. i love, and will always have my iPad screen set to a constant contrast/brightness across the board at all times in all lighting conditions. this is so so important :)

    but as i say, for the average user it's a very decent option.
     
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  4. twerppoet

    twerppoet
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    Well, to be fair to Apple, they didn't say anything about art or photography whan talking aoubt TrueTone. That is entirely my own speculation based on what little I know about traditionaly art media; how the choice of ambient light can effect the artists color perception.

    If someone is working entirely from the iPad, that probably doesn't matter. The eye will adjust to that enviroment. However, if someone were trying to duplicate a natural scene or was using physical media as a reference, it might help; since it would prevent the eye from having to contantly shift between different color casts.

    I don't know if anyone actually uses their iPad this way, and there are certainly ways to work aound the issue (take a photo, use a color sampling tool), but, if someone ever had the urge to use their iPad like an old fasioned canvass to paint a still life or nature sceneb I think TrueTone would be useful. Well, provided they also cared about (and had the eye for) accurate(ish) color reproduction.

    Note: Another factor would probably be the final media presentation. A purely digital piece of art is almost impossible to control, since every screen is a bit different. Printed art would be more suseptable to bad color choices. Of course, youc an always post process your art for printing, and filter the color cast anyway you like. So maybe it's all moot, and the digital art age has simply made ambient light passe.
     

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