Imaging Discussions

Discussion in 'iPad for Photographers' started by Richard Brown, Jun 2, 2013.

  1. Richard Brown

    Richard Brown Super Moderator Staff Member

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    I was fascinated with William Eggleston's photography on show at Tate Modern.

    The photographs on show were taken in one town during Jimmy Carter's campaign to be elected as president.

    image-1874387904.jpg

    W Eggleston was a pioneer in that his photographs crossed the line over to fine artwork. He used colour separation as the process for printing his images in 4? stages in the process. A stage for each colour. Today, professional photographers use that technique when processing RAW digital photographs.

    Sent from my iPad using iPF
     
    Last edited: Aug 20, 2013
  2. Richard Brown

    Richard Brown Super Moderator Staff Member

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    I have been experimenting with the iPad as a device for photographing inscriptions, such as memorial plates or memorials.

    I attach some photos I took with the camera. I used the inbuilt zoom and selective focus facilities. Then the only in iPad processing I carried out was to enhance some of the images.



    image-878557310.jpg



    image-4246305513.jpg

    Above photos show clarity of the zoomed image.


    image-3525092982.jpg



    image-1097963772.jpg



    image-3442194868.jpg

    The camera does a pretty decent job with brass memorial plates.



    image-549550744.jpg



    image-946711182.jpg

    This image before and after enhancement. I took this from about 6 - 7 feet away. I'm impressed with the wide angle capabilities of the camera. This will prove very useful for recording headstone inscriptions.

    The camera adds a good reason for using an iPad for recording objects with inscriptions in the field.

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  3. WoodyAllinone

    WoodyAllinone iPF Noob

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    I like Pic Scanner, an app for iPad and iPhone (https://itunes.apple.com/us/app/pic-scanner/id644278663), and also reviewed it in another thread. It is real handy if you need to scan loads of prints without jumping through technology hoops. It differs from other apps in that it scans multiple photos simultaneously, although you should scan one or two for higher quality. It also automatically crops them into individual JPGs. In testing, I scanned 120 photos in under 30 minutes, direct from albums (Flatbed scanning requires taking out and putting back the photos.) Scans looked sharp enough on iPad's full-screen Retina screen. For sharing on social media, I would have scanned 3 or 4 photos at a go, which would have been faster.

    Attaching a photo scanned with this app. It's not free ($2.99 after free trial), but worth it.

    image.jpg
     
    Last edited: Jul 11, 2014
  4. WoodyAllinone

    WoodyAllinone iPF Noob

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    Richard, iPad is good and its 5MP camera quite adequate for your purpose, but if you also have an iPhone (4s or newer), it has an 8MP camera. With both iPad and iPhone, you will get better results if you don't use the zoom. This is because these devices have an digital, not optical zoom. Also, for indoor scanning, always turn OFF the flash!
     

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