Imaging Discussions

Discussion in 'iPad for Photographers' started by Richard Brown, Jun 2, 2013.

  1. AQ_OC
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    AQ_OC Super Moderator Staff Member

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    This is how I got those scanned above:

    Attached Files:

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  2. Richard Brown
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    Richard Brown Super Moderator Staff Member

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    That's really clever, AQ_OC. I would never have thought of using the iPad for the light source. Do you hand hold the camera?
  3. The OB
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    The OB Super Moderator Staff Member

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    What an interesting technique for getting a film slide onto the camera roll.
    Andrew


    Sent from my iPad using Tapatalk
  4. AQ_OC
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    AQ_OC Super Moderator Staff Member

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    Yep. Right now that's what I'm going. I didn't (and won't as I have to attend to other matters over the coming weeks) use a tripod, but that might help. I found it easier just to put the ipad on a desktop.

    This was a quick and dirty too...prototype just to see how the images come out. I hacked the end of the Cystral light container off with scissors (pretty uneven) and then cut slots in either side at one end to hold the slide. Just roughing it out (I have several of those containers). The cut end of the container is not really flat, but it should be to make this work best.

    The NEX-6 has something called focus peaking (I think OB's camera has that too). I used that sometimes for the focus because the image was quite dark through the view finder. And I had to crop severely on these images.

    I think all of this can be improved quite easily. For one thing, I can use either a macro lens or some extension tubes to decrease focus length. If you use a macro lens, then it will be very important to make sure the slide is in a flat plane that can be aligned with the focal plane of the lens/camera system. I can do a better job of hacking off the end and cutting the slots. I'm wondering too if it would help to control the extra light inside the column as well. I thought about using a column from a roll of paper towels. Not sure if that is large enough, though.

    Anyway, I'm hoping you guys will have some time to play around over the next few weeks. I was planning to do this when Richard started this thread, but life happened and I had other things to which to attend, as I do again now.
  5. AQ_OC
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    AQ_OC Super Moderator Staff Member

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    I'm actually shooting from the top of that tube using a camera. I'm focusing on the slide which is about 3/4 of an inch above the iPad screen. Of course, it works perfectly well using an iPhone too. I just did one and it is actually easier than using a camera (but, not as many pixels and no raw post processing).

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  6. Richard Brown
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    Richard Brown Super Moderator Staff Member

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    I was fascinated with William Eggleston's photography on show at Tate Modern.

    The photographs on show were taken in one town during Jimmy Carter's campaign to be elected as president.

    image-1874387904.jpg

    W Eggleston was a pioneer in that his photographs crossed the line over to fine artwork. He used colour separation as the process for printing his images in 4? stages in the process. A stage for each colour. Today, professional photographers use that technique when processing RAW digital photographs.

    Sent from my iPad using iPF
    Last edited: Aug 20, 2013
  7. Richard Brown
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    Richard Brown Super Moderator Staff Member

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    I have been experimenting with the iPad as a device for photographing inscriptions, such as memorial plates or memorials.

    I attach some photos I took with the camera. I used the inbuilt zoom and selective focus facilities. Then the only in iPad processing I carried out was to enhance some of the images.



    image-878557310.jpg



    image-4246305513.jpg

    Above photos show clarity of the zoomed image.


    image-3525092982.jpg



    image-1097963772.jpg



    image-3442194868.jpg

    The camera does a pretty decent job with brass memorial plates.



    image-549550744.jpg



    image-946711182.jpg

    This image before and after enhancement. I took this from about 6 - 7 feet away. I'm impressed with the wide angle capabilities of the camera. This will prove very useful for recording headstone inscriptions.

    The camera adds a good reason for using an iPad for recording objects with inscriptions in the field.

    Sent from my iPad using iPF
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  8. WoodyAllinone
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    WoodyAllinone iPF Noob

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    I like Pic Scanner, an app for iPad and iPhone (https://itunes.apple.com/us/app/pic-scanner/id644278663), and also reviewed it in another thread. It is real handy if you need to scan loads of prints without jumping through technology hoops. It differs from other apps in that it scans multiple photos simultaneously, although you should scan one or two for higher quality. It also automatically crops them into individual JPGs. In testing, I scanned 120 photos in under 30 minutes, direct from albums (Flatbed scanning requires taking out and putting back the photos.) Scans looked sharp enough on iPad's full-screen Retina screen. For sharing on social media, I would have scanned 3 or 4 photos at a go, which would have been faster.

    Attaching a photo scanned with this app. It's not free ($2.99 after free trial), but worth it.

    image.jpg
    Last edited: Jul 11, 2014
  9. WoodyAllinone
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    WoodyAllinone iPF Noob

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    Richard, iPad is good and its 5MP camera quite adequate for your purpose, but if you also have an iPhone (4s or newer), it has an 8MP camera. With both iPad and iPhone, you will get better results if you don't use the zoom. This is because these devices have an digital, not optical zoom. Also, for indoor scanning, always turn OFF the flash!

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