good stylus

Discussion in 'iPad Air 2 Forum' started by arsz6733, Nov 3, 2015.

  1. arsz6733

    arsz6733
    Expand Collapse
    iPF Noob

    Joined:
    Nov 3, 2015
    Messages:
    2
    Thanks Received:
    0
    Hi my friends
    I want to buy a stylus for my iPad but I don't know what to buy
    I want it to write on my iPad not drawing so what are your suggestions?
    of course I don't have much money!
     
  2. NSquirrel

    NSquirrel
    Expand Collapse
    iPad Enthusiast

    Joined:
    Oct 22, 2014
    Messages:
    359
    Thanks Received:
    224
    In the UK I bought one in Poundland, or somewhere similar. The tip, which is rubbery, needs to be fairly thick, with the 'pencil part' being about 10mm in diameter. I tried something with a very fine tip of a couple of mm, but that did not work for me.
     
  3. arsz6733

    arsz6733
    Expand Collapse
    iPF Noob

    Joined:
    Nov 3, 2015
    Messages:
    2
    Thanks Received:
    0
    any other suggestion?
     
  4. twerppoet

    twerppoet
    Expand Collapse
    iPad Legend II

    Joined:
    Jan 8, 2011
    Messages:
    20,717
    Thanks Received:
    6,647
    All cheap styluses perform pretty much the same. What you pay more for is style, design, and longevity. Don't trust the super thin ones. They will have less reliable touch detection and you'll just end up mashing them harder against the iPads screen. None of them work very well for writing. It's like trying to use big marker pen for writing your notes. It's either hard to read, or you get very little on the page.

    There are only two things that make writing with a stylus on the iPad half way acceptable. One is a good bluetooth stylus with a pen-like point. These are active, need batteries or chargers, and are expensive. Up around $70 or more. But even a fine tip doesn't give you much more sensitivity or control. It just means it's easier to see where the pen is pointing, and makes better use of whatever pen skills you have.

    The other thing is software that lets you write large in a space, but shrinks it on the overall page. The two apps I have that do this are Penultimate and Notability. Using apps like this takes some getting used to, but they allow you to make large, less precise strokes and still fit a reasonable amount of legible text on the page.

    The software solution is more effective than getting a better stylus, but both together are the best solution. That's not to say it's a good solution. If you are expecting to take written notes on an iPad just like you do paper, you are going to be disappointed. The experience is only somewhat related, and less efficient.

    I've tried this on/and off several times, and always end up going back to the basics.

    If I take notes directly on the iPad, I just type them in, preferably in an app that also lets me do some basic sketching so I can add the stuff that's difficult to type (like figures, math, etc.). It's still a pain, so I only do it if the second solution isn't practical.

    What I prefer to do is simply take my notes on paper (I'm fond of Moleskine notebooks). When I'm finished I use the camera and some scanning software to make a picture. Most of the time I use Evernote's Scannable app; because that is where most of my notes end up anyway. If I need more options I use the Scanner Pro app.

    When I get the new iPad Pro (probably not until Spring) I plan on giving direct note taking on the iPad another go. The combination of a more precise stylus and bigger screen should make note taking about as close to paper as a glass screen can get. Of course that larger size will also make the iPad Pro less pleasant to tote around or hold in your hands. So I expect a small Moleskine is still going in my backpack for quick notes that I don't have a good iPhone solution for.

    Disclaimer: The above may make it sound like I'm some kind of note taking expert. That's not true. I probably take 'real' notes a couple times a month. The rest of the time i'm just capturing a few things I jotted down and want to keep for reference. But I do take an active interest in this kind of stuff, because it interests me. So I tend to grab some of the more interesting apps, and I have the the Evernote stylus (based on the Adonit Jot). It's an older one, so it may not be quite as good as the newest; but based on the reviews I've seen of the newer active styluses, the basic limitations are still there. They can't be gotten around with just a stylus. It requires and upgrade of the iPad's hardware as well, which is what we are getting with the iPad Pro.

    A last thought. I would not be surprised if the next generation iPad Air supports the new stylus, or perhaps the model after that. Something to hope for anyway. That 'might' be a truly portable and accurate note taking tablet. Or not. It's really hard to beat the simplicity and utility of pencil and paper.
     

Share This Page